Lx73

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Lx73
x = 37, y = 33, rule = B3/S23 5b2o$6bo2b2o$6bobobo3b2o$7bo7bo$15b3o$9bo$8bobo$9bo$6b3o13b2o$6bo16bo 8b2o$23bob2o5bo$2o20b2obobo5bo$bo25bo4b2o$bobo22b2ob2o$2b2o20b2obobob 5o$23bobobo8bo$22b2ob2ob4o3b2o$22bo3bo5bo$22bo7b2o$22bo7b2o$22bo3bo5bo $2bo19b2ob2ob4o3b2o$2bobo18bobobo8bo$2b3o19b2obobob5o$4bo21b2ob2o$27bo 4b2o$22b2obobo5bo$23bob2o5bo$23bo8b2o$16b2o4b2o$16bo$17b3o$19bo! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]] #C [[ AUTOSTART ]] #C [[ ZOOM 12 GPS 20 LOOP 140 PAUSE 2 T 73 PAUSE 2 WIDTH 480 HEIGHT 480 THUMBSIZE 2 ]]
Pattern type Conduit
Conduit type Elementary
Input Herschel
Output orientation Turned left, flipped
Output offset (12, -20)
Step 73 ticks
Recovery time
(ignoring FNG if any)
70 ticks
Minimum overclock period
(ignoring FNG if any)
Unknown
Spartan? No
Dependent? No
Discovered by David Buckingham
Scot Ellison
Year of discovery Unknown

Lx73 is a periodic elementary conduit. After 73 ticks, it produces an inverted Herschel turned 90 degrees counterclockwise at (12, -20) relative to the input. The form shown in the infobox has a recovery time of 70 ticks; without the block-suppressing eater 1 and the eater 5 that eats the output's first natural glider, the recovery time increases to 120 ticks.

History

The Herschel+domino reaction in Lx73 was found no later than 1991 — about the same time some p8 R64 conduits were discovered — when Dave Buckingham constructed two p8 versions of Lx73, one of which uses a figure eight and the other one two blockers.[1] The second variant releases an extra glider to the southeast, enabling the construction of gunstar 2.

x = 74, y = 39, rule = B3/S23 12b2o$13bo48b2o$13b3o47bo$63b3o8$21b2o48b2o$70bobo$19bo3bo45b3o$19bo4b o44b2o$21bobobo46b2o$22bobobo44b3o$23bo4bo$24bo3bo$o70b2o$obo22b2o23b o20b2o$3o47bobo$2bo47b3o$52bo11$56b2o$56b3o$50b2o2bo2bobo$50b2o2b2o2b 2o$54b2o! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]] #C [[ AUTOSTART ZOOM 10 GPS 20 LOOP 140 PAUSE 2 T 73 PAUSE 2 WIDTH 800 HEIGHT 600 ]]
Two p8 versions of Lx73 (click above to open LifeViewer)
RLE: here Plaintext: here

In May 2007, Scot Ellison found a smaller version of the heavyweight volcano for the conduit, as shown in the infobox. It has better clearance in the north, allowing the usual block-eating eater 1 in most elementary H-to-X conduits.[2] For comparison an older, bulkier p5 variant is employed in the period-435 glider gun.

In the patterns shown above, ghost Herschels mark the output Herschels' locations.

HLx53B

As can be seen at generation 53, an intermediate B-heptaplet forms inside an Lx73 conduit, which will evolve into the output Herschel 20 generations later. Meanwhile the residual block is cleaned along with other junks.

If instead the block survives, the mechanism will become a Herschel to B-heptomino converter known as HLx53B, which immediately led to L112 after the discovery of BFx59H by Dave Buckingham.

x = 24, y = 20, rule = B3/S23 2o$bo20b2o$bobo18bo$2b2o16bobo$20b2o6$2bo$2bobo$2b3o$4bo2$14b2o$14b2o 2b2o$18bobo$20bo$20b2o! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]] #C [[ AUTOSTART ZOOM 10 Y -3 GPS 20 LOOP 74 PAUSE 2 T 53 PAUSE 2 T 73 PAUSE 2 WIDTH 480 HEIGHT 400 ]]
HLx53B converter (click above to open LifeViewer)
RLE: here Plaintext: here

However, note that the Lx73 shown above cannot be viewed as a composite conduit made up of an HLx53B and a BF20H.

See also

References

  1. David Buckingham (October 12, 1996). "My Experience with B-heptominos in Oscillators". Retrieved on August 18, 2020.
  2. Dave Greene (February 1, 2008). "New p5 Herschel technology". Game of Life News. Retrieved on August 18, 2020.