Kickback

From LifeWiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search
x = 7, y = 12, rule = B3/S23 5bo$4bo$4b3o7$b2o$obo$2bo! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]] #C [[ THUMBNAIL THUMBSIZE 3 WIDTH 560 HEIGHT 240 PAUSE 2 AUTOSTART GPS 10 LOOP 50 ]]
The 180-degree kickback
(click above to open LifeViewer)
RLE: here Plaintext: here
x = 7, y = 12, rule = B3/S23 5bo$4bo$4b3o7$bo$2o$obo! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]] #C [[ THUMBNAIL THUMBSIZE 3 WIDTH 560 HEIGHT 240 PAUSE 2 AUTOSTART GPS 10 LOOP 50 ]]
The 90-degree kickback
(click above to open LifeViewer)
RLE: here Plaintext: here

A kickback is any of the two 2-glider collisions resulting in a single glider travelling in the opposite direction to one of the original gliders. In a 90-degree kickback, the two gliders collide at right angle, while in a 180-degree kickback they are head-on. Both output gliders are one half-diagonal away from the lane of one of the inputs.

The 90-degree kickback is important in the original proof of the existence of a universal constructor (using an elbow ladder) and in Bill Gosper's total aperiodic, as well as a number of other constructions and glider syntheses. Thus the term kickback reaction may also refer to the 90-degree one specifically. The 180-degree kickback is rarely used in signal circuitry or in self-supporting patterns like the Caterpillar or Centipede, because it is generally less easy to arrange.

External links