Difference between revisions of "Shuttle"

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Simple shuttles commonly have a [[period]] that is a multiple of 2, but asymmetric shuttles are also known, in which one end is stabilized by a different period mechanism from the other.
 
Simple shuttles commonly have a [[period]] that is a multiple of 2, but asymmetric shuttles are also known, in which one end is stabilized by a different period mechanism from the other.
  
==See also==
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== See also ==
*[[:Category:Shuttles|List of shuttles]]
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* [[:Category:Shuttles|List of shuttles]]
  
==External links==
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== External links ==
 
{{LinkWeisstein|Shuttle.html}}
 
{{LinkWeisstein|Shuttle.html}}
 
{{LinkLexicon|lex_s.htm#shuttle}}
 
{{LinkLexicon|lex_s.htm#shuttle}}

Latest revision as of 18:23, 5 December 2019

A shuttle is an oscillator that consists of an active region moving back and forth between stabilizing objects. The most well-known and first discovered examples are the queen bee shuttle (which is sometimes referred to as the shuttle) and the twin bees shuttle. A large number of t-tetromino and pre-pulsar shuttles are known, including the p30 Eureka. Reflectors can be used to construct glider shuttles.

Simple shuttles commonly have a period that is a multiple of 2, but asymmetric shuttles are also known, in which one end is stabilized by a different period mechanism from the other.

See also

External links