Dart

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Dart
7bo7b$6bobo6b$5bo3bo5b$6b3o6b2$4b2o3b2o4b$2bo3bobo3bo2b$b2o3bobo3b2ob$ o5bobo5bo$bob2obobob2obo! #C [[ THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 THUMBLAUNCH AUTOSTART ]] #C [[ TRACKLOOP 3 0 -1/3 THUMBSIZE 2 GPS 3 ]]
Pattern type Spaceship
Number of cells 34
Bounding box 15×10
Direction Orthogonal
Period 3
Mod 3
Speed c/3
Heat 32
Discovered by David Bell
Year of discovery 1992

Dart is a c/3 orthogonal spaceship that was found by David Bell in May 1992. It is currently the smallest known bilaterally symmetric c/3 spaceship, being slightly smaller than the turtle.

History

In December 2014, Martin Grant found a 72-glider synthesis of this spaceship based on components from Mark Niemiec, Michael Simkin, and Ivan Fomichev, making it the first spaceship of this speed with a known synthesis.[1] Later the synthesis was reduced to 25 gliders.[2]

Everything surrounding the dart synthesis and gun creation was very collaborative. After the first 72 synthesis found by Martin Grant, Chris Cain found a reduction to 62 gliders. The first dart gun was created by Michael Simkin based on Martin Grant's synthesis. There followed another major reduction to 39 gliders by Martin Grant. Michael Simkin suggested a different way to synthesize the tail, while Tanner Jacobi found a particular way to reduce the synthesis to 35 gliders using Michael Simkin's method. Chris Cain suggested a way to reduce the front synthesis, which Michael Simkin implemented to reduce the synthesis to 28 gliders. Meanwhile Ivan Fomichev found a tricky way to save two gliders in Tanner Jacobi's recipe for the tail, and Michael Simkin found a way to remove another glider from the front, reducing the cost to 25 gliders.

After that, further attempts were made to create a dart gun. The first P160 gun was made by Martin Grant, while Alexey Nigin constructed a smaller P210 gun. Two more guns were made, one by Michael Simkin, the other (smaller one) by Dave Greene. Finally Chris Cain built the smallest P160 gun known today.

See also

References

  1. Martin Grant (December 1, 2014). "Re: How about a dart synthesis?". Retrieved on December 2, 2014.
  2. Chris Cain (December 18, 2014). "Re: How about a dart synthesis?". Retrieved on December 23, 2014.

External links

  • Dart at the Life Lexicon