Talk:List of long-lived methuselahs

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Inclusion of methuselahs on this list

I propose that methuselahs only be included on this list if 1) they are 20 cells or smaller and 2) they last at least 1000 generations. If people want to discuss these criteria or some new criteria, please feel free to do so. Nathaniel 23:43, 9 February 2009 (UTC)

To be honest, the name of this list makes me think that it should only include the single longest-lived methuselah of each cell count. Then just the 20 cells criterion would be enough with no need for generational discrimination. That or just rename it "List of long-lived mesthuselahs" because that's closer to what it is right now, I think. Elithrion 00:17, 10 February 2009 (UTC)
Ah, good call. I think I'll go the "list of long-lived methuselahs" route then. Nathaniel 01:38, 10 February 2009 (UTC)

About 30000 generations?

I posted this one 19 months ago in comp.theory.sci-automata:

#N Ewa (Eve)
x = 16, y = 10
14bo$14bo$15bo$9bo3b2o$7bo4b3o$7bo3bo$9b2o$bo$3o$obo!
..............*.
..............*.
...............*
.........*...**.
.......*....***.
.......*...*....
.........**.....
.*..............
***.............
*.*.............

I think it runs for some 30044 generations before stabilizing. 217.173.190.141 15:07, 14 February 2010 (UTC)

Wow, that's pretty impressive (by the way, it actually runs for 30046 generations); I'm sorry that it's been missed by the general Life community. How exactly was it found? do you still have the original pattern from which it came? (I'm assuming that it was found by testing large numbers of random patterns) Here is a link to the post alluded to above.
~Sokwe 19:57, 14 February 2010 (UTC)
I'm not sure now which option of my search program was used, but it was almost certainly generated through testing random walk patterns; when a promising one was found, it was also tested in combination with another predefined pattern (in this case, a hexomino) in various relative positions.
The random walk patterns were created by taking a number of random steps (8 directions allowed) and setting the cells on with a given probability (around 0.8).
217.173.190.141 14:31, 15 February 2010 (UTC)