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Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 July 2018

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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby rowett » June 5th, 2018, 12:51 pm

Some low hanging fruit:
  • 180-degree kickback - ... that produces a [a] clean output glider
  • bistable switch - The pattern below shows the "boat" state of the [the] memory cell...
  • burn - If the object being burned has a spatial [periodocity -> periodicity], then the...
  • catch and throw - The [interations -> interactions] are caused...
  • Demonoid - No spaceship gun pattern had previously been completed [completed] before...
  • Fast Forward Force Field - writer, the physicist Robert L. [Forward.See -> Forward. See] also...
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby dvgrn » June 5th, 2018, 2:07 pm

rowett wrote:Some low hanging fruit...

Thanks! All corrected in the source file now. Update coming along eventually.
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby Naszvadi » June 5th, 2018, 4:48 pm

dvgrn wrote:
rowett wrote:Some low hanging fruit...

Thanks! All corrected in the source file now. Update coming along eventually.

  • Oscillators are made maked as pn (where n is a positive integer), meaning that the period is n (p1 indicates a still life).
  • This is an artifact artefact of the search methods used to find such spaceships, rather than an indication of what a "typical" spaceship might look like.

I might be wrong or some of the above are already known. Bold = original/suspicious, Italic = my proposal
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby Majestas32 » June 5th, 2018, 4:57 pm

> makes

On that note why isn't "naked" the past participle of a verb "nake"
Please, stop spam searching Snowflakes.
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby 77topaz » June 5th, 2018, 5:17 pm

"Maked" is definitely wrong. "Artefact" vs. "artifact" is just another one of those American vs. British English things, I think - for example, my browser's spellcheck marks "artefact" as the correct spelling.
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby dvgrn » June 5th, 2018, 5:35 pm

Naszvadi wrote:[*]Oscillators are made maked as pn (where n is a positive integer)...

This took some tracking down. Somehow an "r" got removed from the single-page introductory text (only) -- a long time ago, it looks like, since Edwin Martin's Lexicon intro page has the same error. The multipage introduction has the correct word, "marked".
Naszvadi wrote:This is an artifact artefact of the search methods used to find such spaceships...

This is another subtle case like "traveling" vs. "travelling" -- neither option is technically wrong, but one option, "artefact", is preferred in Britain and the other, "artifact", is more common in the U.S. I'm certainly not going to change all of Stephen Silver's "colour"s to "color", and in fact whenever I happen to notice I'll deliberately use a British spelling for consistency, as in this case.

No doubt I have failed to simulate British English perfectly -- in particular, I'm refusing to worry about having "colourised" and "stabilzed" and "synchronized" in various definitions. At one point there was a single "stabilised" and 23 "stabilized"s in the source document, so I standardized (heh) on the American form. However, I did change all the "traveling"s to "travelling", just to get them all spelled the same way.
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby Macbi » June 6th, 2018, 9:09 am

I did "S":

:smoke Debris that is fairly long-lived but eventually dies completely. Basically, a large spark. This term is used especially when talking about the output from a spaceship such as the smoking ship. Some Herschel conduits such as Fx119 also create large amounts of smoke.

:smoking ship A spaceship which produces smoke. If the smoke extends past the edge of the rest of the spaceship, then it can be used to perturb other objects as the spaceship passes by. Running gliders into the smoke is often a good way to turn or duplicate them, or convert them into other objects. Sometimes the smoke from a smoking ship may itself be perturbed by accompanying spaceships in order to form a puffer. A simple example of a smoking ship is the Schick engine.
It's weird that something is referred to as "the smoking ship" but then under "smoking ship" there's no particular ship that refers to.

Malfunctioning links under "syringe":
A different version of the large catalyst, with better [[clearance]] for some situations, can be seen in the [[switch]] entry.
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby dvgrn » June 6th, 2018, 9:52 am

Macbi wrote:It's weird that something is referred to as "the smoking ship" but then under "smoking ship" there's no particular ship that refers to.

True enough. I think the original "smoking ship" might have been the Schick engine, but there are references out there to lots of other smoking ships and there isn't a canonical one any more. Fixed...

Macbi wrote:Malfunctioning links under "syringe"...

Oops! Double square brackets are LifeWiki format, where the Lexicon conversion script needs single curly braces. There was another similar mistake in :PF35W:. All fixed now for the next release -- thanks!
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby rowett » June 9th, 2018, 5:21 pm

One more...
  • still life - ... the pattern can [referred -> be referred] to as a constellation.
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby dvgrn » June 9th, 2018, 11:11 pm

rowett wrote:One more...
  • still life - ... the pattern can [referred -> be referred] to as a constellation.

Thanks -- fixed. Anyone want to tackle another letter? I think I'll wait to check in all the changes until (just before) the final Golly 3.2 build, but it sounds like that might only be a few weeks away.

Here are the changes from the Release 29 beta recorded so far, not including changing a bunch of "the end of 2017" to "June 2018":

:180-degree kickback:  removed duplicate "a"
:180-degree kickback:  The only other two-{glider} collision besides the standard {kickback} that produces a clean output glider with no leftover {ash}.  The 180-degree change in direction is occasionally useful in {glider synthesis}, but is rarely used in {signal} circuitry or in {self-supporting} patterns like the {Caterpillar} or {Centipede}, because 90-degree collisions are generally much easier to arrange.
        .*.
        *..
        ***
        ...
        ...
        .**
        *.*
        ..*

:(2,1)c/6 spaceship:  A {knightship} that travels obliquely at the fastest possible speed.  To date the only known example of a spaceship with this velocity is {Sir Robin}.

:antstretcher:  Any {wickstretcher} or {wavestretcher} that stretches {ants}.  Nicolay Beluchenko and Hartmut Holzwart constructed the following small {extensible} antstretcher in January 2006:

:B-heptomino: (stabilizes at time 148)  This is a very common {methuselah} that evolves into three {block}s, two {glider}s and a {ship} after 148 generations. Compare with {Herschel}, which appears at generation 20 of the B-heptomino's evolution. B-heptominoes acquired particular importance in 1996 due to Dave Buckingham's work on {B track}s.  See in particular {My Experience with B-heptominos in Oscillators}.
        *.**
        ***.
        .*..
   This pattern often arises with the cell at top left shifted one space to the left, producing a seven-bit {polyplet} that shares the same eight-bit descendant but is not technically a heptomino at all.  This alternate form is shown as the input for {elementary} {converter} patterns such as {BFx59H} and {BRx46B}. This is standard practice for elementary {conduit}s, since many of these conduits do in fact produce this alternate form as output.
   The B-heptomino is considered a failed {puffer} or failed {spaceship}, since on its own it travels at c/2 for only a short time before being affected by its own trailing debris.  However, it can be stabilized into a c/2 puffer or into a {clean} c/2 rake or spaceship.  See, e.g., {puffer 2}, {backrake 2}, or {ecologist}.

:bistable switch:  removed duplicate "the"

:bouncer:  added link to {p15 bouncer}

:bumper:  fixed a singular reflector that should have been plural

:burn: [periodocity -> periodicity]

:catch and throw:  interations -> interactions

:Demonoid: removed duplicate word "completed", reworded HashLife-friendly Demonoid description to be future-proof:
"A smaller Hashlife-friendly single-channel Demonoid design was completed in 2018."

:Fast Forward Force Field: added space [Forward.See -> Forward. See]

:fish: reference to *WSS
:fish:  A generic term for {LWSS}, {MWSS} and {HWSS}, or, more generally, for any {spaceship}.  In recent years {*WSS} is much more commonly used to refer to the small orthogonal c/2 spaceships.
:growing spaceship: wavestretcher reference
:growing spaceship:  An object that moves like a {spaceship}, except that its front part moves faster than its back part and a {wick} extends between the two.  Put another way, a growing spaceship is a {puffer} whose output is burning {clean}ly at a slower rate than the puffer is producing it.  Examples include {blinker ship}s, {pi ship}s, and some {wavestretcher}s.

:nonomino switch engine predecessor:
:nonomino switch engine predecessor:  This is the unique nonomino (a {polyomino} having 9 cells) whose {evolution} results in a {switch engine}, and the smallest polyomino to do so.
        ***...
        ..*.*.
        ..****
     Charles Corderman may have found this object in 1971 while exhaustively investigating the {fate} of all the small {polyomino}es.  Records indicate that he found the {switch engine} while investigating the decominos (polyominos having 10 cells). However, there do not appear to be decominos which result in a {clean} {switch engine}.  If Corderman was examining polyominos in order of size, then this smaller {predecessor} should have been found first in any case.
     
:p4 reflector: changed to new standard term "bouncers" instead of "pipsquirter-based reflectors"

:parent: Last sentence "  Finite patterns have only a finite number of non-trivial parents." wasn't true.  Removed.

:PF35W: fixed bad links from LifeWiki

:pulsar:  Changed: "See also {pre-pulsar} and {pulsar quadrant}." to "See also {pre-pulsar}, {pulsar quadrant}, and {quasar}."

:reverse caber tosser:  A storage mechanism for data feeding a {universal constructor} designed by Adam P. Goucher in 2018.  A very large integer can be encoded in the position of a very faraway object.  If the distance to that object is measured using {circuit}ry designed to be as simple as possible, a complete decoder and universal constructor can be created by colliding a small number of gliders - no more than 329, according to a June 2018 {glider synthesis}.
     With the correct placement of the faraway object, the complete pattern is capable of building any glider-constructible object.  This means that 329 is the maximum number of gliders required to build any constructible object, no matter what size.  The maximum may turn out to be somewhat less than this, if a more efficient universal constructor is designed or a cheaper synthesis is found.

:sawtooth: removed glider, reduced minimum population by 1

:sliding block memory:  "key salvos from it are used"

:smoke: (there isn't really a single canonical smoking ship)
:smoke:  Debris that is fairly long-lived but eventually dies completely.  Basically, a large {spark}.  This term is used especially when talking about the output from a {smoking ship}.  Some {Herschel conduit}s such as {Fx119} also create large amounts of smoke.

:spaceship: Added Sir Robin to table.

:still life: added "be"

:syringe: fixed bad links from LifeWiki

:universal constructor: edited, added link to :reverse caber tosser:
:universal constructor:  A pattern that is capable of constructing almost any pattern that has a {glider synthesis}.  This definition is a bit vague.  A precise definition seems impossible because it is not known, for example, whether all {still life}s are constructible.  In any case, a universal constructor ought to be able to construct itself in order to qualify as such.
     An outline of Conway's proof that such a pattern exists can be found in {Winning Ways}, and also in {The Recursive Universe}.  The key mechanism for the production of gliders with any given path and timing is known as side-tracking, and is based on the {kickback reaction}.  A universal constructor designed in this way can also function as a universal destructor:  it can delete almost any pattern that can be deleted by gliders.
     In May 2004, Paul Chapman and Dave Greene produced a prototype programmable universal constructor.  This is able to construct objects by means of {slow glider construction}s.  It likely that it could be programmed to construct itself, but the necessary program would be very large; moreover an additional mechanism would be needed in order to copy the program.
     A universal constructor is theoretically most useful when attached to a {universal computer}, which can be programmed to control the constructor to produce the desired pattern of gliders.  In what follows I will assume that a universal constructor always includes this computer.
     The existence of a universal constructor/destructor has a number of theoretical consequences.
     For example, the constructor could be programmed to make copies of itself.  This is a {replicator}.
     The constructor could even be programmed to make just one copy of itself translated by a certain amount and then delete itself. This would be a (very large, very high period) {spaceship}.  Any translation is possible, so that the spaceship could travel in any direction.  If the constructor makes a rotated but unreflected copy of itself, the result would be a looping spaceship or {reflectorless rotating oscillator}.
     The constructor could also travel slower than any given speed, since we could program it to perform some time-wasting task (such as repeatedly constructing and deleting a block) before copying itself.  Of course, we could also choose for it to leave some debris behind, thus making a {puffer}.
     It is also possible to show that the existence of a universal constructor implies the existence of a {stable} {reflector}.  This proof is not so easy, however, and is no longer of much significance now that explicit examples of such reflectors are known.
     Progressively smaller universal-constructor mechanisms without an attached universal computer have been used in the {linear propagator}, {spiral growth} pattern, and the {Demonoid}s and {Orthogonoid}.  See also {single-channel}.
     Another strange consequence of the existence of universal constructors was pointed out by Adam P. Goucher and Tanner Jacobi in 2015.  Any glider-constructible pattern, no matter how large, can be constructed with a fixed number of gliders, by working out a construction recipe for a universal constructor attached a decoder that measures the distance to a faraway object.  The object's position encodes a numeric value that can be processed to retrieve as many bits of information as are needed to build a {slow salvo} to construct any given target pattern.  The simplest design, requiring less than a thousand gliders, is described in {reverse caber tosser}.

:washerwoman:  added discovery date

A wick-like structure attached at both ends to moving spaceship-like patterns, in such a way that the entire pattern is mobile.  Especially if the wave gets longer over time, the supporting patterns are {wavestretcher}s.

:*WSS:  reference to {fish}
:*WSS:  Any of the standard orthogonal {spaceship}s - {LWSS}, {MWSS}, or {HWSS}.  At one point the term {fish} was more common for this group of spaceships.
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby Sokwe » June 11th, 2018, 4:00 am

I just looked through the 'Q' entries. Here are some issues I found:
  • :quadratic filter: superscript error in big-O notation.
  • :quadratic growth: two places with possible inappropriate commas: "Bill Gosper's breeder, in 1971" and "for Life patterns, between linear". The second one might be corrected simply by removing "for Life patterns,".
  • :quadratic sawtooth: "caber tossers" should be a link. Also, I think "toggle rake guns" should be "toggleable rake guns", possibly with a link to {toggleable gun}.
  • :quadri-Snark: "The catalyst cause" -> "The catalyst causes"
  • :Quetzal: This should probably open with the current definition of "Quetzal" and then mention that it was the name given by Leithner to his p54 gun. A Quetzal is any Herschel track-based gun with a period below 62 (62 is the lowest period with a stable glider-emitting conduit). Also, at the end of the first paragraph, add something like the following: "Quetzals of periods 57-61 have also been constructed."

Here are some other issues I noticed:
  • :exponential filter: In big-O notation there should be one more closing parenthesis.
  • :waterbear: This is no longer the smallest nor fastest oblique spaceship.
  • The {quasi still life} entry mentions the rate of growth of the number of strict/pseudo/quasi still lifes. This information should perhaps be added to {strict still life} and {pseudo still life}.
  • The indefinite article ('a' vs 'an') preceding LWSS/MWSS/HWSS needs to be standardized. I personally prefer 'a', but I'm open to either.
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby dvgrn » June 11th, 2018, 8:21 am

Sokwe wrote:I just looked through the 'Q' entries...

Thanks! I ended up fixing indefinite articles for *WSSes to "an", by checking how many of each there were already and going with the majority vote. It was just slightly in favor of "an", which does make it easier to read the definition out loud.

Made all the other suggested changes also -- they're mostly quick fixes, so I'll only quote these two:

:Quetzal:  Any Herschel track-based gun with a period below 62, which is the lowest period with a stable glider-emitting conduit.  This was Dieter Leithner's name for the {true} p54 glider gun he built in January 1998 -- a short form of {Quetzalcoatlus}, which expresses the fact that the gun was a very large {Herschel loop} that was not an {emu}.  Shortly afterwards Leithner also built a p56 Quetzal using a mechanism found by Noam Elkies for this purpose.  In October 1998 Stephen Silver constructed a p55 Quetzal using Elkies' p5 {reflector} of the previous month.  Quetzals of periods 57-61 have since been constructed.
     Some of the more recent Quetzals are not Herschel loops, but are instead short Herschel tracks firing several glider streams all but one of which is reflected back to the beginning of the track to create a new Herschel.  Noam Elkies first had the idea of doing this for the p55 case, and Stephen Silver constructed the resulting gun shortly after building the original (much larger) p55 Quetzal. Jason Summers later built a p54 version, which is more complicated because the evenness of the period makes the timing problems considerably more difficult.

:waterbear: ((23,5)c/79 obliquely, p158) A {self-supporting} oblique {macro-spaceship} constructed by Brett Berger on December 28, 2014. It is currently the fastest oblique macro-spaceship in Conway's Game of Life by several orders of magnitude, and is also the smallest known oblique macro-spaceship in terms of bounding box, superseding the {Parallel HBK}.  It is no longer the smallest or fastest oblique spaceship due to the discovery in 2018 of the {elementary} {knightship} {Sir Robin}.
     Previous oblique spaceships, the {Gemini} and the {half-baked knightship}s, are stationary throughout almost all of their life cycles, as they construct the necessary mechanisms to support a sudden short move.  The waterbear constructs support for {reburnable fuse} reactions involving {(23,5)c/79 Herschel climber}s that are in constant motion.

EDIT: I did a quick run through 'P', and found a few things worth fixing:

Added links to :p1 telegraph:
Added {telegraph} link to :high-bandwidth telegraph}
Changed p15 bumper and p7 bumper "reflector" links to "bouncer".
Added a minor clarification to :parity:
Added note to :partial result:, re-oriented pattern to match {Sir Robin}
Added link in :periodic: to {intermittent stream}.
Added note to :puffer: about macro-spaceships

I wrote too many of the new 'P' entries myself, though, so an independent review might still be a good idea.
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby Sokwe » June 12th, 2018, 3:59 am

dvgrn wrote:I did a quick run through 'P', and found a few things worth fixing... I wrote too many of the new 'P' entries myself, though, so an independent review might still be a good idea.

Okay, I looked through 'P' and this is what I found:
  • :p15 reflector: this never refered exclusively to the p15 bouncer due to the existence of {PD-pair reflector}
  • :p246 gun: should say "{true} period {glider gun}" instead of "{true} {glider gun}"
  • :p4 reflector: should say "For another small periodic colour-preserving glider reflector, see p4 bumper."
  • :p5 bouncer: possibly an inappropriate comma: "in September 1998, by welding". Second sentence should start "The minimum"
  • :p7 bumper: this incorrectly states that it uses a p7 pipsquirter.
  • :p92 gun: should possibly say "Period 92 guns can also be made by adding a {semi-cenark} to any period 46 glider gun." as the other known semi-snarks don't work at period 46.
  • :paperclip: It seems strange to describe this still life as "uncommon" (even more so with {mango})
  • :partial result: "If no partial results are found [than -> then] it is likely"
  • :pedestle: Found by Dave Buckingham, 1973.
  • :pentadecathlon: this is unambiguously the fifth most common oscillator, being slightly more frequent than the {clock}.
  • :puffer: in the last sentence, there are also no puffers of speed (2,1)c/6

Add the following entry:
:phase shift = {phase change}

Remove :p22 bumper. There is a smaller p11 bumper, but even that is not really useful until period 121, as lower multiples of 11 can be achieved with much smaller lower-period bumpers.
x = 31, y = 32, rule = B3/S23
28bo$28bobo$28b2o9$17bo$17bobo$17b2o2$9b2o4b2o$9b2o3bo2bo$3b2o4b2o4bob
o$4bo5b2o4bo$2bo5bob2o$2b2o2b3o11b2o$5bo4bobo7bo$2b3ob2ob2ob3o6b3o$bo
4bo4bo3bo7bo$obobo3b2obo2bo$obo6bobobo$bo2b5o2b2o$2b2o4bobo$4b4o2bo$2b
2o6b2o$2bo2bo$4b2o!
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby Dean Hickerson » June 14th, 2018, 4:32 am

Most of the patterns shown have dots added to the ends of their lines to make all lines the same length. But there are 4 exceptions:
  • :anvil:
  • :cis-beacon on anvil:
  • :LWSS:
  • :sesquihat:

A few more comments:

  • :Fast Forward Force Field: In last paragraph, there should be a space after "Forward.".
  • :oscillator: I'm skeptical about the claim (4th paragraph) that "An oscillator can be constructed from any {gun} by adding {eater}s to consume its output". If the gun produces some large, complicated spaceship, then there might not be an eater for it. Even if there is, it might be too slow to work at the period of the gun.
  • :trivial: Maybe it should be mentioned that there are nontrivial examples of trivial oscillators, like:
  • :trivial p6: (p6) Found by Dean Hickerson, December 1994. Every cell has period less than 6, so this is a {trivial} oscillator. It is unusual because it has period-2 cells in contact with period-3 cells.
    x = 27, y = 18, rule = B3/S23
    11b2o$11bo6b2o$8b2obo6bo2bo$8bobob2ob2obob2o2bo$bo8bo2bobo2bo2bobobo$b
    obo5b2o2bobobob2o2bo2bo$bobobo8b2obobob2ob2o$7bobob3o3bo4b2o$2bo3bo4bo
    b2o8bo$4bo3b3o2b2ob3obobob2o$2o2bo6bo10bobo$2bo11b2ob2o3bobo$8bob5o3bo
    4bo$8b2o3bo2bo2bo$11b4ob3o$8b3o4bo$8bo2bo2bo2b2o$10b2o3b2obo!
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby dvgrn » June 14th, 2018, 11:38 am

Dean Hickerson wrote:[*]:oscillator: I'm skeptical about the claim (4th paragraph) that "An oscillator can be constructed from any {gun} by adding {eater}s to consume its output". If the gun produces some large, complicated spaceship, then there might not be an eater for it. Even if there is, it might be too slow to work at the period of the gun.

True enough. And there's actually another caveat that should technically be added to that paragraph.

Oscillators consisting of separate objects which do not react in any phase are usually ignored. For example, a separated {blinker} and {pulsar} makes a period 6 oscillator, but is considered {trivial}.
An oscillator can be divided into a {rotor} and a {stator}, and the stator can be further subdivided into {bushing} and {casing}. Some oscillators have no casing cells, and a few 100%-{volatility} oscillators also have no bushing cells.
An oscillator can be constructed from any {gun} as long as {eater}s can be added to consume its output. If it is a {true} {gun} then the period of the oscillator will be the same as the gun - unless the eating mechanism multiplies the period, as in the case of gliders caught by a {boat-bit}.


I've made all the other changes as well. Thanks!
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby Dean Hickerson » June 16th, 2018, 9:18 am

I wrote::trivial: Maybe it should be mentioned that there are nontrivial examples of trivial oscillators,

There are also trivial examples of nontrivial oscillators, in which 2 oscillators don't interact, but their rotors overlap, so that the periods of cells in the overlap are larger than the periods of the constituent oscillators. For example, here are a p92 gun+eater and a p138 gun+eater which don't interact. But their glider paths cross, and cells there have period 276:
x = 70, y = 55, rule = B3/S23
12b2o5b2o$12b2o5b2o5$32b2o5b2o$28b2o2b2o5b2o2b2o$28b2o13b2o3$33bo5bo$
32b3o3b3o$31b2o2bobo2b2o19bobo$31bo3bobo3bo18b4o$31bob2o3b2obo18b3o$
31b2o7b2o$11b2obo3bob2o$11bo2bo3bo2bo38b3o$12b3o3b3o30b2o7bo$52b2o2bob
obobo$51b3o2bo$52b2o2b3o3b3o2b2o$64bo2b3o$58bobobobo2b2o$39bo20bo7b2o$
b2o34bo2bo17b3o$o2bo15b2o5b2o9bo$o7bo10b2o5bo14bo$o2bo3bobo18bob2o6bo
19b3o$2ob2ob2ob2o16b2ob2o7b3o15b4o$4bobo7b2o41bobo$3b2ob2o6b2o11b2ob2o
$28bobo$28bobo$29bo$39bobo$b3o3b3o29b2obo$o9bo31bo$o3bobo3bo31b2o$b3o
3b3o$2bo5bo5$22b2o7b2o$21bobo7bobo$21bo11bo$20b2o11b2o4$b2o5b2o$b2o5b
2o!

I don't know any examples of this that don't use guns or Herschel conduits, but they probably exist. For example, if we had 2 oscillators that make accessible sparks, and whose periods have a large enough gcd, we could arrange them so that their sparks occupy the same space at different times.
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby Redstoneboi » June 16th, 2018, 10:27 am

i guess an oscillator is trivial if the 2 separated if either no cell oscillates at the full period or certain subpatterns are actually just spaceship interactions.
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby dvgrn » June 16th, 2018, 11:36 am

Dean Hickerson wrote:There are also trivial examples of nontrivial oscillators, in which 2 oscillators don't interact, but their rotors overlap, so that the periods of cells in the overlap are larger than the periods of the constituent oscillators.

It almost seems as if something like this came up on Catagolue, but maybe that was just adjacent rotors. I'm also reminded of the pseudo p25 gun that pretends to be period 50 but is actually period 150 due to off-beat use of p30 oscillators:

x = 143, y = 109, rule = LifeHistory
3.B4.A5B38.2A44.2A$.6BABA6B4.2B28.2B2AB42.B2A2B$.4B2A3BA7B.4B27.4B44.
4B$2A3B2A3BA12B26.4B46.4B$2AB.B2A3BA13B26.4B44.4B$.B4.BABA14B26.4B17.
2A6.2A17.4B$8.A5B4.7B25.5B14.2B2AB4.B2A2B14.5B$18.2B3A2B25.5B14.4B6.
4B14.5B$18.BA3BAB24.7B13.5B4.5B13.7B$18.A5BA24.7B14.5B2.5B14.7B35.2A$
18.2ABAB2A24.3BA3B14.5B2.5B14.3BA3B34.B2A2B$18.7B24.2B3A2B14.12B14.2B
3A2B35.4B$4.B4.5BA4.5B4.A5B15.B5AB13.14B13.B5AB36.4B$2.11B4A2.2BA2B2.
4A6B4.B8.2A3B2A14.12B14.2A3B2A20.2A13.BA2B$2.10B2ABABA.BABAB.ABAB2A7B
.B2A8.5A14.3BA6BA3B14.5A20.B2A2B11.3AB$.2A8B3ABA2BABABABA2BAB3A8B2A8.
A3BA7.2A4.3B3A4B3A3B4.2A7.A3BA21.4B10.A3BA$.2AB.7B2ABABA3BA3BABAB2A
10B10.ABA7.B2AB4.BA2B2A2B2A2BAB4.B2AB7.ABA23.4B9.2BA2B$2.B4.6B4A2.5B
2.4A11B2.3B2AB3.AB7.B2.B.4B3ABA2BAB3A4B.B2.B7.BA3.B2A3B4.B9.4B9.A5BA$
9.5BA5.3B5.A5B4.B2.4BABA7B3.B2.7B2ABAB2A2B2ABAB2A7B2.B3.7BABA9B7.4B9.
A5BA$20.3B17.4BA6B2A7BA6BA2BA10BA2BA6BA7B2A6BA8B6.2BA2B9.BA3BAB$20.3B
16.5BA2BA2BA2BA6BA5B6A8B6A5BA6BA2BA2BA2BA7B2A5.2BA2B9.2B3A2B$19.5B15.
5BA6B2A7BA6BA2BA10BA2BA6BA7B2A6BA5B.B2A4.2BABA2B8.7B$20.3B14.2AB.4BAB
A7B3.B2.7B2ABAB2A2B2ABAB2A7B2.B3.7BABA4B4.B5.B2AB2AB8.7B$20.3A13.A.AB
3.3B2AB3.AB7.B2.B.4B3ABA2BAB3A4B.B2.B7.BA3.B2A3B12.A5BA9.5B$17.9B10.A
14.ABA7.B2AB4.BA2B2A2B2A2BAB4.B2AB7.ABA20.3BA3B9.5B$16.2A.5B.2A8.2A
13.A3BA7.2A4.3B3A4B3A3B4.2A7.A3BA19.2A3B2A9.4B$16.2A.5B.2A23.5A14.3BA
6BA3B14.5A19.7B9.4B$17.4BA4B23.2A3B2A14.16B10.2A3B2A9.3B2AB4.2BA2B4.B
2A6B$19.2BA2B25.B5AB13.17B10.B5AB7.3BA2BA3B2.2BA2B2.3BA2BA5B$18.2BABA
2B24.2B3A2B14.17B9.2B3A2B6.3BA8B.B3AB.8BA5B$18.7B10.2A12.3BA3B15.4B2.
11B8.3BA3B5.4BA8BA5BA8BA5B$16.B.B2AB2AB.B8.A13.7B13.5B3.11B8.7B5.4BA
9B2AB2A9BA4B$7.3B3.B.2A3BABA3B2A.B2.BA.A13.7B13.2A6.10B9.7B3.2AB.3BA
2BA3B2.B3AB2.3BA2BA3B$7.5B5A3BABA3B5A.3A15.5B15.A6.9B11.5B3.A.AB3.3B
2AB5.3A5.B2A3B$6.2A3B3A2BA4BA4BA2B4A17.5B12.3A7.12B8.5B3.A17.3B$6.2A
2B2A3BA5BA5BA3B2A5.2A6.A4.4B12.A8.12B2A8.4B2.2A17.3B$7.B.2BA19BAB4.B
2AB3.3A4.4B18.2B.12BA.A7.4B20.5B$10.2B3A13B3AB5.3B3.A8.4B16.2A2B2A9B
3.A8.4B20.3A$12.19B7.B.B2.2A6.4B17.2AB.B2A8B3.2A6.4B21.3B$12.19B5.9B
5.B2A2B18.B.3BA8B10.B2A2B18.9B$10.2B3A13B3A12B8.2A23.3B3A2B2A12.2A19.
2A.5B.2A$7.B.2BA19BA6B2A3B33.3B2ABA3B33.2A.2BA2B.2A$6.2A2B2A3BA5BA5BA
3B2A11B30.2AB2.2B2AB36.3BABA3B$6.2A3B3A2BA4BA4BA2B3A14B27.A.AB3.4B38.
5B$7.5B5A3BABA3B5A15BA26.A6.4B37.A5BA$7.3B3.B.2A3BABA3B2A16BABAB24.2A
7.4B24.2A10.3BA3B$16.B.B2AB2AB.B.17B2A2B33.4B24.A8.B.2A3B2A.B$18.7B3.
15B3.4B33.4B23.A.AB2.B.13B.B3.3B$18.2BABA2B3.15B4.4B33.4B23.2AB.24B$
19.2BA2B6.4B.6B7.4B33.4B10.A13.25B2A$17.4BA4B5.2B2.3B11.4B33.4B9.3A5.
2A4.11BA13B2A$16.2A.5B.2A8.B2A12.4B33.4B11.A3.2BAB3.10B3A11B.B$16.2A.
5B.2A9.A14.4B33.4B9.2A3.3B5.22B$17.9B11.3A12.4B33.3BA8.5B.B.B5.8B3A8B
$20.3A16.A13.4B33.3BA9.7B5.8B3A8B$20.3B31.4B33.3AB7.34B$19.5B31.3BA
33.4B6.21B3A11B.B$20.3B33.3BA33.4B5.22BA13B2A$20.3B34.3AB33.4B3.6B2A
29B2A$9.5BA5.3B5.A5B24.4B3.41BA2BA4B3A22B$2.B4.6B4A2.5B2.4A6B4.B18.4B
.2BA19B2A18B3A6BA15B.B3.3B$.2AB.7B2ABABA3BA3BABAB2A7B.B2A18.6BA18B2AB
2A17BA6B2A2B.B.2A3B2A.B$.2A8B3ABA2BABABABA2BAB3A8B2A17.27B4A23BA4B3.
3BA3B$2.10B2ABABA.BABAB.ABAB2A10B17.5BABA21B2A13B.10BABA2B3.A5BA$2.
11B4A2.2BA2B2.4A11B16.4B2.B2AB39.4B2.BABA6.5B$4.B4.5BA4.5B4.A5B4.B17.
4B4.A3B36.5B4.2B5.3BABA3B$18.7B30.4B6.4B35.2A13.2A.2BA2B.2A$18.2ABAB
2A29.4B8.4B35.A13.2A.5B.2A$3.2A13.A5BA28.4B10.4B31.3A15.9B$.2B2AB4.A
7.BA3BAB27.4B5.2A5.3BA30.A20.3B$.4B5.3A5.2B3A2B26.4B5.B2A2B4.ABAB50.
3A$4B9.A4.7B25.2A2B7.4B5.2A2B48.5B$.4B7.2A5.5B25.2B2A9.4B5.4B48.3B$.
4B7.4B3.5B24.2BAB9.4B7.4B47.3B$.5B8.3B3.3B15.AB7.4B10.4B8.4B35.3B2AB
5.3A5.B2A3B$.B3AB7.5B3.4B12.A.AB.2B2.4B10.5B9.2BAB27.B4.3BA2BA3B2.B3A
B2.3BA2BA3B$B2AB2AB6.5B5.2A2.2A3.2A4.A10B11.5B10.2B2A25.2AB.4BA9B2AB
2A9BA4B$B2AB2AB5.7B4.A3.A4.A6.B.7B11.7B10.2A2B24.2A6BA8BA5BA8BA5B$B5A
B5.7B5.3A2.A3.A6.7B12.7B11.4B24.7BA8B.B3AB.8BA5B$2A3B2A5.2ABAB2A7.A.
2A2.2A5.7B13.2ABAB2A12.4B23.8BA2BA3B2.2BA2B2.3BA2BA5B$7B5.7B7.A2.A.A
2.3B2.6B14.7B13.4B24.B4.3B2AB4.2BA2B4.B2A6B$7B5.A5BA4.A3.A3.A6B.7B13.
A5BA14.3BA37.7B9.4B$.5B6.7B4.4A3.A.6B2.5B14.7B15.3BA36.2A3B2A9.4B$.5B
7.2AB2A12.2A14B14.2AB2A17.3AB35.3BA3B9.5B$2.2B2A7.2BA2B7.2A4.B.14B4.
2A7.2BA2B18.4B34.A5BA9.5B$2.4B8.3B7.B2AB5.13B4.B2AB7.3B20.4B33.B2AB2A
B8.7B$3.8BA3.2B7.B2.B.5B3A4B3A5B.B2.B7.2B3.A5B13.4B32.2BABA2B8.7B$2.
8BABA5B3.B2.9BA2BA4BA2BA9B2.B3.5BABA6B4.B7.4B32.2BA2B9.2B3A2B$.9B2ABA
18BA3BA4BA3BA18BAB2A8B.B2A7.BABA31.2BA2B9.BA3BAB$.9B2AB2A7B3A7BA12BA
7B3A7B2AB2A10B2A8.B2AB31.4B9.A5BA$2.8B2ABA18BA3BA4BA3BA18BAB2A11B10.A
3B30.4B9.A5BA$4.6BABA5B3.B2.9BA2BA4BA2BA9B2.B3.5BABA11B11.4B30.4B9.2B
A2B$6.5BA3.2B7.B2.B.5B3A4B3A5B.B2.B7.2B3.A5B4.B14.4B28.4B10.A3BA$14.
3B7.B2AB4.14B4.B2AB7.3B28.4B26.B2A2B11.3AB$13.2BA2B7.2A4.16B4.2A7.2BA
2B28.3BA26.2A13.BA2B$8.B4.2AB2A14.14B14.2AB2A4.B24.ABAB41.4B$7.3A2.7B
14.12B14.7B2.3A24.2A2B39.4B$8.2A2.A5BA13.14B13.A5BA2.2A26.4B37.B2A2B$
7.2A3.7B14.12B14.7B3.2A26.4B37.2A$7.BA3.2ABAB2A14.5B2.5B14.2ABAB2A3.A
B27.4B$4.2A.3B2.7B14.5B2.5B14.7B2.3B.2A25.2BAB$4.A2.2A3.7B13.5B4.5B
13.7B3.2A2.A26.2B2A$5.3AB4.5B14.4B6.4B14.5B4.B3A28.2A2B$9.A3.5B14.2B
2AB4.B2A2B14.5B3.A33.4B$7.2AB4.3B17.2A6.2A17.3B4.B2A32.4B$6.A2.A2.4B
46.4B2.A2.A32.4B$6.A2BAB.2A50.2A.BA2BA33.3BA$4.A.A.BA2B.A50.A.2BAB.A.
A32.3BA$4.2A5.2A52.2A5.2A33.3AB!

But that's clearly a non-trivial p150 interaction, so not strictly relevant either.

Here's the current text in the :trivial: entry, with another sentence added for the non-interacting case:

:non-trivial:  A non-trivial period-N {oscillator} contains at least one cell that oscillates at the full period.  In other words, it is not made up solely of separate oscillators with smaller periods. Usually it includes a {spark} or other reaction that would not occur if all lower-period subpatterns were separated from each other, but some exceptions are given under {trivial}.  See also {omniperiodic}.

:trivial:  A trivial period-N oscillator is one in which every cell oscillates at some smaller factor of N.  See {omniperiodic}.  For example, the joining of a period 3 and a period 4 {oscillator} as shown below creates a single object which is a trivial oscillator of period 12.
        ........*.*.
        ...........*
        .......*..*.
        ......*.*.*.
        ......*..*..
        ....**.**...
        ...*..*.....
        ....*.*.....
        **...*......
        .*.**.......
        ...*........
        ...*........
   However, there are trivial oscillators that meet this requirement, but may still be considered to be {non-trivial} because the different-period {rotor}s are not separated by {stator} cells.  An example is Dean Hickerson's {trivial p6}.  Conversely, there are oscillators formed by trivial combinations of high-period {gun}s or {sparker}s that are only technically non-trivial, because the lower-period components overlap but do not interact in any way.
     "Trivial" is also used to describe a {parent} of an object which has groups of cells that can be removed without changing the result, such as isolated faraway cells.  For example, here is a trivial parent of a block.
        *......
        .*....*
        .*.....
        *......

:trivial p6: (p6)  An {oscillator} found by Dean Hickerson in December 1994. Every cell has period less than 6, so this is a {trivial} oscillator. It is unusual because it has period-2 cells in contact with period-3 cells.
        ...........**..............
        ...........*......**.......
        ........**.*......*..*.....
        ........*.*.**.**.*.**..*..
        .*........*..*.*..*..*.*.*.
        .*.*.....**..*.*.*.**..*..*
        .*.*.*........**.*.*.**.**.
        .......*.*.***...*....**...
        ..*...*....*.**........*...
        ....*...***..**.***.*.*.**.
        **..*......*..........*.*..
        ..*...........**.**...*.*..
        ........*.*****...*....*...
        ........**...*..*..*.......
        ...........****.***........
        ........***....*...........
        ........*..*..*..**........
        ..........**...**.*........
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby dvgrn » June 17th, 2018, 9:43 am

I went through N and O this morning, and found a few things:

- Adjusted wording in :oscillator:, added link to {boat-bit} (see a few posts up)
- Added a sentence to :one-time:
- Adjusted wording in :Osqrtlogt:
- Spacing was wrong in :NW31:

:one-time:  A term used for {turner}s and {splitter}s, specifying that the reaction in question is not repeatable as it would be in a {reflector} or {fanout} device.  Instead, the {constellation} is used up, usually in a {clean} reaction, but the much more common {dirty} turners and splitters are also very useful in some situations.

:Osqrtlogt:  ... The population returns infinitely often to its initial minimum value (during carry operations from 11111...1 to 100000...0, so it can be considered to be an unusual form of {sawtooth}.

So that's the second half done! How about the first half?
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby Apple Bottom » June 17th, 2018, 1:24 pm

Adding to the pile of work-to-be-done, rather than reducing it --- now that we've got a reverse caber tosser, surely that deserves a Lexicon entry. Should we wait until after v29 and queue it for v30, or is it OK inserting new material at this late stage of the review process?
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby dvgrn » June 17th, 2018, 2:18 pm

Apple Bottom wrote:Adding to the pile of work-to-be-done, rather than reducing it --- now that we've got a reverse caber tosser, surely that deserves a Lexicon entry. Should we wait until after v29 and queue it for v30, or is it OK inserting new material at this late stage of the review process?

Already in. Just not on the conwaylife.com/ref site yet, because getting a draft out there takes a bunch of hours of rebuilding and rechecking HTML files, and I try to avoid that part of the job as long as possible.
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby wildmyron » June 18th, 2018, 1:27 am

One comment on the revised text of :universal constructor: "... by working out a construction recipe for a universal constructor attached _to_ a decoder that measures the distance to a faraway object."

dvgrn wrote:<snip>
- Spacing was wrong in :NW31:
<snip>

Proofreading the html files means most errors of this sort would be missed. I did a quick pass through the full text files searching for such spacing errors and found one in :unknown fate:.

I proofread through 'M'
  • :Mickey Mouse: - refers to a name "proposed" for the still life. Doesn't seem to fit with the philosophy of including terms in the lexicon once they are in general use. I don't think the term should be removed, but either it's in or it's out.
  • :Moore neighbourhood: states that "The von Neumann neighbourhood of a cell can be thought of as the points at a Chebyshev distance of 1 from that cell.", it should read "The _Moore_ neighbourhood ...".
  • :mosquito5: references a list of successive smaller population super linear growth patterns which should culminate in switch engine ping pong. Perhaps this list, if it is to be included at all, should be maintained in a single place, though there's no mention of any patterns with superliner growth in its entry, and only the current record holder in :breeder:. :catacryst: seems to have the most complete list.
  • :MWSS: Contains "Here is the three-glider {synthesis}:". The link to :synthesis: redirects to :glider synthesis:

Other issues:
  • Similar to :mosquito5:, :wedge: claims to be the smallest initial population superlinear growth. Hmm, whoever reviewed 'W' must have missed that...
  • Several entries related to breeders and superlinear growth mention "superlinear growth" but don't link to it. Examples: :breeder:, :catacryst:, :Jaws:, :metacatacryst:, :mosquito1: -> :mosquito5:, :Pianola breeder:, :teeth:, :wedge:
  • Not a single term in the lexicon refers to :mod: (not even :period:), nor is the mod of any pattern specified using this term. Is this an editorial decision? Completely understandable if it is, and I'm not suggesting it be reconsidered, just curious.
  • Inconsistent spelling of -ominos / -ominoes. Including links (i.e. -omino}es in text version) -ominoes has the greater usage.
  • There are a few instructions in the lexicon to refer to citations in the bibliography (e.g. :density: and :hashlife:). Is there any possibility of making these actual links or is this difficult due to technical limitations of the lexicon build process?
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby wildmyron » June 21st, 2018, 11:34 pm

I read through 'L' (perhaps not as thoroughly as other sections) and didn't find any issues. I did wonder if :lake: should have a (p1) annotation, but that's probably only the case if the term refers just to the still life shown in the entry.

Instead of clicking on every link to test them this time I used https://validator.w3.org/checklink. Perhaps it's worthwhile someone running this tool (or a similar local version) on the whole lexicon.

Edit: Ah, I see that the lake also has an entry under :small lake:, but this alternative name isn't mentioned under :lake:.
Last edited by wildmyron on June 21st, 2018, 11:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby Majestas32 » June 21st, 2018, 11:48 pm

All lakes are p1
Please, stop spam searching Snowflakes.
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Re: Life Lexicon update -- now Release 29, 2 June 2018

Postby wildmyron » June 22nd, 2018, 12:58 am

Majestas32 wrote:All lakes are p1

To clarify - what I meant is that: the term should have a (p1) annotation IF it applies exclusively to the example pattern, rather than a family of p1 patterns.
Seeing as it turns out that this still life has another entry, and there are other terms for families of patterns which aren't annotated, then perhaps it should be left off. I leave that to dvgrn to decide.

'K' was so short I couldn't resist finishing that one off too. Barely anything to report.
  • :knightship: contains "... but as of the end of 2017 ...". The second half of the first paragraph reads rather awkwardly, but I can see the flow of ideas there so not necessarily any need to modify.
  • :Kok's galaxy: Is it worth mentioning its use as the Golly icon?
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